brain

The Impact of Music on Little Ears

Image source: franciscanchildrens.org

Many studies over the years have shown that it is never too early to introduce your child to music. Regardless of whether he or she truly comprehends the music being played, simply listening has been reported to reduce stress and anxiety, improve sleep, and sharpen memory and mental alertness- according to an article written by Katie Gagnon.   

While all of these benefits stand true no matter what age, it is said to be more distinguished among young children with developing brains. These long-term benefits that can take effect include, "improved language development, enhanced motor skills, better social skills, higher IQs, increased concentration and basic memory recall" (Katie Gagnon, May 2018). If you would like to see even greater mental and physical benefits in your child, consider signing them up for music lessons where they are taught to read music or play an instrument. The more involved your child is in music, the better your child's chances are of experiencing these benefits.

 

Many parents find trouble in starting their kids in music, because they do not know how to simply start their child on an instrument or think that it is too costly. However, having your child involved in music daily may be simpler thank you think! Many parents have even decided to begin exposing their child to music before they are even born by playing music out loud for them to hear in the womb. While this may seem like an early start to many, there are other ways to expose your child to music from a very early point in their lives. Some ideas that parents use from almost day one may include:

  1. Buying toys or instruments that play music or make sounds

  2. Playing music in the car (classical music is a good starter for younger children and babies)

  3. Singing songs to them (such as nursery rhymes or any other upbeat and kid-friendly song)

  4. Enrolling them in music lessons when able

  5. AND MORE!

There are a plethora of options for having your child enrolled in music, and these activities can evolve as the child grows older. While these activities may not stay consistent throughout their childhood years or even their whole lives, building an appreciation for music in your child from a young age can increase the chance in them being involved in music for the rest of their life.

Unique Brains: The reason behind those goosebumps

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What is the meaning behind those goosebumps you get when you listen to an ear tugging piece of music?

According to the PHD student Matthew Sachs of University of Southern California, you could have a unique brain. Sachs conducted a study where he had twenty students listen to three or five songs. Of those twenty students only ten of them said they felt shivers during this study. These twenty students then had their brains scanned, and according to the researchers the ten students who admitted to feeling shivers during the music had “a higher volume of fibers that connect their auditory cortex to the areas associated with emotional processing” as said by Sachs. The study states that people who are more open to experience, or have musical training are more likely to have this so called “unique” brain, but even as a music student I have never gotten goosebumps by listening to music (although I have cried on multiple occasions while listening to music).

 The article provides music videos from YouTube that are said to generate goosebumps due to the chords provided in the song, but I still have not experienced this so called musical chill. l am typically emotional when I hear a good opera aria, but I have never produced goosebumps due to these emotions. This article has made me wonder if I would have a unique brain.

Do you think you have a unique brain?

I would like to thank Maddy Shaw Roberts for creating the article that gave me all this interesting information.