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Make Music Day-Annual Celebration of Music

MAKE MUSIC DAY- AN ANNUAL CELEBRATION OF MUSIC

Music lovers: there's a day set aside just for you. The best part is, it's free!

On June 21st, the NAMM (National Association of Music Merchants) Foundation and Make Music Day alliance will host their annual worldwide celebration of music for all those who share a love for music. Make Music Day is held each year in more than 800 cities across 120 countries. So if you've planned a vacation out of the state or country around this time, there's still a chance to participate!

Over 4,500 outdoor concerts, music lessons, and other music-related events are scheduled in more than 80 U.S. cities- including Florida's very own, Miami Beach! 

These events were created to appeal to everyone and every music genre, whether you love hip-hop, opera, Broadway, country, or pop!

For an inside look of what to look forward to, check out the video below:

Pursuing a Career as a Music Teacher

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A career as a music teacher or instructor is a very unique profession to hold, considering the lasting effects you will have on those you teach and the daily activities a music teacher is involved in. This can range from teaching students how to read music, how to play an instrument, or vocal performance. For this reason, many music teachers specialize in specific areas of music where they have the experience- such as teaching how to play piano or sing opera. One can teach music within schools or be a private music teacher working from a studio or home. Public music teachers also usually have a lesson plan they follow, whereas the latter will have to adjust their lesson plans according to each child and their needs.

What are the Steps to Become a Music Teacher/Instructor? 

If you decide to become a public music teacher, having a bachelor's degree in music and completing a state-approved teacher preparation program is required. According to Teacher Certification Degrees the full process to becoming a music teacher generally includes:

  1. Earning a bachelor's degree in music or music education (including a teacher preparation program)
  2. Completing a music internship at the grade level you wish to teach
  3. Taking your state-certified test for teachers
  4. Applying for a teaching certificate
  5. Applying for music teacher positions wherever you can after college

On the other hand, becoming a private music instructor is less strenuous- there are no official requirements unless you are planning to work for a private company. Even then, the requirements will vary per company. Since having a degree in music is not necessarily needed, almost anyone can become a private music instructor. However, whether a person is qualified or not is an important point. While there is more flexibility when it comes to being a private music teacher, there are usually some minimum requirements that must be met in order to become a successful private instructor in your area. To see some of these requirements, check out these two blogs by Brian Jenkins and CareersinMusic.com.

Qualities Needed to Be a Great Music Teacher

There is a huge difference between being a music teacher and being a great music teacherIf you are interested in this career path, you should strive to become the best music teacher you can so that the impact you make on a young musician's life is lasting. Want to know if you have some of the qualities needed? Let's take a look! This is just a small list, inspired by Jordan Smith and his blog on 10 Qualities of a Great Music Teacher.

  1. Must be able to connect with students
  2. Have great communication skills
  3. Always willing to learn
  4. Not afraid to challenge students
  5. Make learning fun!

Being a music teacher, especially to young children, requires patience and dedication. It is not enough to be a skilled musician when taking on this job- you should also have a natural ability to work with children of all ages. This, of course, makes the job much more special! If you are deciding to be a music teacher, whether public or private, know that you will be making a lasting impact on your student's life. Not only will you be teaching them, but also guiding and instilling principles within them that will carry the rest of their lives.

If this sounds like the career for you, don't hesitate! Start taking the necessary steps now because you won't regret it! 

For more info or questions on how to get started, please contact us:

Phone: (407) 710-5675

Email: ryanacemusic@gmail.com

Unique Brains: The reason behind those goosebumps

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What is the meaning behind those goosebumps you get when you listen to an ear tugging piece of music?

According to the PHD student Matthew Sachs of University of Southern California, you could have a unique brain. Sachs conducted a study where he had twenty students listen to three or five songs. Of those twenty students only ten of them said they felt shivers during this study. These twenty students then had their brains scanned, and according to the researchers the ten students who admitted to feeling shivers during the music had “a higher volume of fibers that connect their auditory cortex to the areas associated with emotional processing” as said by Sachs. The study states that people who are more open to experience, or have musical training are more likely to have this so called “unique” brain, but even as a music student I have never gotten goosebumps by listening to music (although I have cried on multiple occasions while listening to music).

 The article provides music videos from YouTube that are said to generate goosebumps due to the chords provided in the song, but I still have not experienced this so called musical chill. l am typically emotional when I hear a good opera aria, but I have never produced goosebumps due to these emotions. This article has made me wonder if I would have a unique brain.

Do you think you have a unique brain?

I would like to thank Maddy Shaw Roberts for creating the article that gave me all this interesting information.